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It was actually a morning like every other


when I looked in my wardrobe, turned to my husband and said:
"What am I going to wear?"

I know, it's THE classic feminine phrase. It is an everyday problem for us women but as a breastfeeding mother, it can become an even greater dilemma.

Every woman should be proud of her body and what it is achieving every day. But after the birth of my third child, I must confess that I did not feel comfortable presenting my belly covered in scars to the public.

The Birth


I had my first operation at 33 weeks of pregnancy for a serious appendicitis and then had an emergency caesarean section on January 31, 2018. We had to stay more than 20 days in the hospital because I had to undergo another operation after Lou's surgery....

My medical treatments, nursing and pain medication were incompatible with breastfeeding.
Lou was therefore fed with formula milk and as the days progressed, I noticed more and more bandages on my belly, and increasingly empty breasts.

The Last Bottle

On Saturday, 17th of February 2018, the last bottle was given to my baby boy in the hospital room 203.
I looked at my beautiful baby, and in comparison myself so damaged.
We were finally allowed to go home.
At home everything was ready and waiting for us: bottles, milk powder... Daddy took care of everything.

But as soon as I got home, I felt new strength.
An instinct perhaps, that told me to trust myself.
I wanted the end of my pregnancy to be different, I would never have imagined, even in my worst-case scenarios, such a childbirth.

I didn't want to also have to give up breastfeeding. After two weeks it was, of course, not easy.

I put Lou to my breast, he cried, rejected. I didn't want to give up, I put him on again and again. Until we finally found each other and we could move away from using the milk powder completely.

And so I stood in front of my wardrobe and wanted to put on something comfortable, something that covered my stomach when I breast-fed my little Lou.

So, again, I asked: "Why are there no stylish and practical breastfeeding shirts?

To which my husband replied: "Why don't you design some yourself?"

Medical Carer

The idea seemed crazy. I was a nursing assistant by profession. I knew how to take care of my patients, my 3 children, and maybe bake a cake. But design clothes?

I couldn't get my husband's answer out of my head and so 10 days later a first design was made in a small tailor's shop in La Rochelle, just a few metres from the sea. Several phone calls, emails and appointments later I was suddenly sat with Lou on a plane to Portugal, where our shirts are produced. We chose a small family owned factory, with a female boss, who helped me to bring the project to life.

That’s how our living room became our office from one day to the next. Parcels everywhere, I asked myself over and over again: "What are we actually doing here?

The actual plan was, at that point in time, that I would go back to work in the hospital.

My brother, who was visiting us for a few days, probably never thought that our guest room would, more or less, become his future home. In fact, he's been part of Tajinebanane ever since... I didn't return to the hospital either!

I didn't even have a computer...no plans. None of my wildest projections could have imagined such a crazy adventure and today, thanks to you, we are both working with our spouses and my children, as my top supporters, with one goal: allow mothers in France and abroad to be free, confident and proud to breastfeed
anywhere, anytime!

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